Piccolo Seeds - Flower Seeds
Piccolo Seeds - Flower Seeds
Piccolo Seeds - Flower Seeds
Piccolo Seeds - Flower Seeds

Piccolo Seeds - Flower Seeds

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£3.50
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£3.50
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Why not treat yourself to some seeds to grow inside our lovely pots. 

Borage Blue -also known as starflower, is an edible ornamental and medical plant, the praises of which have been sung by some of the most famous herbalists in history. John Gerard’s Herball includes –the saying Ego borago, gaudia semper ago, meaning ‘I, borage, bring always courage’. And, according to Pliny the Elder, when borage leaves and petals are put into wine, it ‘makes men and women glad and merry, and drives away all sadness, dullness and melancholy’. With such commendations, it’s no surprise that the Blue and White Flowered Mix variety has became a favourite in modern mixology, being used to garnish cocktails such as the gin-based Pimm’s Cup. 

 

Roman Chamomile - a perennial, small and creeping plant with daisy-like flowers. The plant has a wonderful, sweet, fruity scent and is commonly used to make herbal infusions for medicinal uses. 

While it is probably the most popular and well-known therapeutic plant, chamomile is also a popular ingredient in a number of magical rituals. When it comes to deities, chamomile is linked to Cernunnos, Ra, Helios, and other sun gods. At the same time, the Vikings had a more practical use for chamomile, adding it to their hair shampoos to aid in the lightening of blond hair. In a number of folk magic traditions, particularly those of the American south, chamomile is known as a lucky flower and, if you're a gambler, washing your hands in chamomile tea will ensure good luck at the gaming tables.  

 

Lavender Munstead Blue - a perennial flowering plant native to the Mediterranean. Munstead Blue, in particular, is its compact, early blooming, English variety, with bluish-purple flowers above slender, aromatic, grey-green leaves. First introduced in 1916 by the garden designer Gertrude Jekyll, and named after her house Munstead Wood in Surrey, England, this variety is a great choice for containers and is widely used in cooking as a condiment for salads, soups, stews. It provides a very aromatic flavour that is too strong to be used in large quantity. Its fresh or dried flowers are used to make tea, while the fresh flowers can be crystallized or added to jams, ice cream and vinegars.  An essential oil is also made from the flowers for both culinary and therapeutic purposes.